The Magnetic resonance imaging for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms to predict Rupture or Surgery (MA3RS) study

The Magnetic resonance imaging for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms to predict Rupture or Surgery (MA3RS) study

The Magnetic resonance imaging for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms to predict Rupture or Surgery (MA3RS) study was the culmination of 10 years’ work exploring the use of a ‘smart’ magnetic resonance contrast agent (an ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (USPIO) called ferumoxytol) to identify cellular inflammation and disease activity in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

Research Methods and Objectives:

The MA3RS study was funded by a £2-million grant from the Medical Research Council National Institute for Healthcare Research Efficacy and Mechanisms Evaluation Programme and was conducted under a Clinical Trial Authorisation from the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Authority (MHRA). We recruited over 360 patients who were imaged and followed for a median of approximately 3 years. We demonstrated, for the first time, that USPIO-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can predict disease progression (rate of aneurysm expansion) and clinical outcome (repair, rupture and mortality). This is the first time a cellular imaging technique that detects disease activity has predicted outcome.

Chief Investigator: David Newby

Co-Investigators: Olivia McBride, Rachael Forsythe, Jenny Robson, Marc Dweck, Michelle Williams

Key Publications:

Richards JMJ, Semple SI, MacGillivray TJ, Gray C, Langrish JP, Williams M, Dweck M, Wallace MD, McKillop G, Chalmers RTA, Garden OJ, Newby DE. Abdominal aortic aneurysm growth predicted by uptake of ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 2011;4:274-81.

The Magnetic resonance imaging using ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide in patients under surveillance for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm to predict Rupture or Surgical repair (MA3RS) Study Investigators. Aortic wall inflammation predicts abdominal aortic aneurysm expansion, rupture and need for surgical repair. Circulation. 2017;136:787-797.